Into the Heart of the Jungle

Jungle eyes

By Tom Fedro

Jim Stengel is an author, business guru, and experienced global marketing executive.  His branding expertise surpasses most, and I’ve enjoyed wisdom I’ve garnered from his writing, especially his new book.  He focuses on consumer branding more than business to business, which is no surprise given he was the global marketing officer for Proctor and Gamble, a company legendary for its ability to brand consumer products.  He came to mind a few days ago as I caught up on my various feeds and found him quoted in a post about great marketing quotes.  Here’s his quote:

If you want to understand how a lion hunts don’t go to the zoo. Go to the jungle.

It was a bit strange to see that quote right in the middle of a list of quotes that spoke of customer awareness, product development, advertising, and response ratios.  Each of the others was a somewhat pompous truism (and let’s face it,  a lot of the “experts” can make even the most basic marketing statement in a completely pompous way—myself included.)  I suppose that’s why it stuck with me, and I found myself realizing it had a lot of value in the world of B2B technology.
One of the problems with those of us in the tech sector—especially in tech startups—is that we tend to market our product as though our customers were caged.  In a zoo, the lion gets what’s thrown through the bars of its cage.  It’s docile.  It’s reactive and not proactive.  In short, it’s just waiting for the zookeeper to direct its behavior.  How often do we market to our customers with the same perspective?  We parcel our data and try to control the sale as though our targets lived in a cage and had no ability to see beyond the exhibit.
That’s not today’s customer for us.  Today’s executive isn’t locked in a cage.  We’re not zookeeper’s handing out controlled portions of information with which to make a buying decision. On the contrary, today’s executive is constantly on the hunt.  Access to information is almost completely without barrier today and it doesn’t come from zookeepers in call centers.  Our customers aren’t caged and we can’t control the sale.  So what do we do?  There’s a simple answer, though it’s by no means easy.  We start exploring the jungle.

Revolutionary Concepts

revolution

By Tom Fedro

Business gurus have to keep in business, right?  Sometimes I think that’s why we end up with a new management flavor of the month just about…well, just about every month, I suppose.  There are always new books in the business section of the local store or on Amazon or even at an office supplies store.  It’s amazing to me how often I see the words, “The Revolutionary New Way To” followed by something like Motivate Employees or Increase Profits or Boost Productivity.  For just twenty bucks or so, I can join the revolution.  I’ll admit it, there are times I can’t help myself.  I’m a businessman and an entrepreneur at heart, and that means I sometimes splurge on books with titles like these.

Let’s face it, though.  For the most part, everything revolutionary has already performed the coup.  When I read the typical two-hundred page book, I usually don’t.  What I mean is that I read with great interest the introduction which promises me brilliant insight throughout the book.  Then, I read the first chapter full of excitement.  Then, I read the second chapter with considerably less excitement.  Then, I end up skimming the book and trying to find something from it that’s valuable.  There’s always something useful, but almost nothing revolutionary.  Realistically, business just isn’t that complicated.  It all comes down to supply and demand and profit and loss in a macro sense and operational efficiency in a micro sense.  I’m reading looking for something life changing, but I end up with a tip or a trick or two.

Why is that?  Maybe I’m cynical, but I think it parallels news and information.  When I was younger, there were local newspapers, national magazines, and three networks for news.  Now, there are multiple 24 hour news channels, and an unlimited feed of news stories online.  None of that happened because more things became newsworthy.  Instead, the media became adept at creating news to fill the gaping maw of emptiness.  I think that’s what we see in business.  There’s a constant desire for the next brilliant business revolution, but let’s just face reality.  Most businesses who operated correctly ten years ago or even twenty are still operating correctly.  The real questions CEOs should be asking don’t have to do with how to do business but with how to respond to a changing marketplace.

To me, the revolution we really need is an approach to our changing customer that takes into account their new needs (real and perceived) and their new buying habits.  Remember that your customer base is subject to the same unending flow of information that we are, and this access to information means we’re no longer their primary method of education about our products.  Buying cycles are far longer in the initial stages and then blisteringly fast from a truly qualified lead to the close.  It’s time for the gurus out there to start finding ways to help companies with that, not a revolutionary new business process but a revolutionary new way to think of Sales and Marketing.  Let’s face it, I’m going to pick up the next business book I see, but I’m still holding out hope for the one I really need.

Finding and Solving Problems

Maze

By Tom Fedro

Ultimately, all business is about solving problems.  From the earliest trade to the most recent, a problem is identified (or even created) and someone comes along with a solution to that problem in order to create value.  Sometimes, the problem isn’t easy to envision as such.  Video games were created for entertainment, right?  Where’s the problem they solved?  Well, in that case the problem was boredom.  In fact, entertainment options and their availability made boredom more of a problem than it was before.  A mind not entertained now is almost unbearable to most Americans.

From the perspective of a start-up, there are three crucial elements of this business reality.  First, a start-up needs to solve a problem.  If you’re not looking at your product as the means by which a problem is solved, you’re not in the world of technology.  The most beautiful code in the world, if it doesn’t solve a problem, is effort that won’t help you.  Sure, you might create some elegant code but the esteem of your fellow tech heads isn’t going to get you far with your banker. Ultimately, a technology start-up is a solutions start-up, and it’s hard to create a solution when you’ve no idea what it is you’re trying to solve in the first place.

That’s not enough, though.  A successful startup has to recognize why the problems exist.  I love to think of automated backup as the perfect example of this.  Really, how hard is it to press a button at the end of the day and backup data, right?  Still, the automation was created to fix the element of error created by the human factor.  Someone had to understand the problem before a solution could be presented.

A good technology startup solves a problem and understands the human aspect of it.  Then, and also critical, a successful startup determines how to sell the solution to the people with the problem. Without this last part, the other two are irrelevant.  A successful company needs to identify the problem, solve it, and then convince someone to both see the problem and the solution.  Otherwise, we’re spinning our wheels.  We’re creating beautiful code and earning pats on the back instead of profits.

What problem is your startup addressing?

Some Thoughts on Philanthropy

Tom Running.high res

Start-ups aren’t all the romantic fun that Hollywood makes them out to be.  We tend to see the drama and the excitement long after the company in question has succeeded.  We see Google or Apple or Microsoft with dramatic increases in shareholder value and we forget that the founders spent long sleepless nights wondering if they’d make payroll on Friday or if the money for the lease would come in.  We picture those wonderful “aha!” moments when everything falls into place and tend to forget that, for the most part, getting a business off the ground is just hard work, plain and simple hard work.

Once you launch the business and your shingle is on the front door, you’re going to get hit with requests for help from worthwhile and deserving causes.  That’s fine by me.  I think we all ought to do our best to contribute in any way we can.  Here are some thoughts on the subject.

Stay in Business

The first and most honorable thing you can do to help society is to stay in business!  How many employees rely on you to pay their bills and feed their families?  You’re obligated first to keep your business running, to avoid layoffs, and to provide an income for the employees relying on you.  You can directly benefit a great many people by providing training and opportunity to those working for you.

Help Others Stay in Business

What works for you works for other companies as well.  One of the clients who uses a product we developed was able to save three hours of work every single day by implementing our solutions.  The entire IT department at Purdue University saw their workload reduced by using the Adaptive Restore product.  What does that mean?  It means the department was able to save resources and provide better services.  The efficiency of the entire organization benefited.  Create and deliver products that do the same for your customers.

Encourage Participation

When possible, don’t just write checks.  Even if you have a few thousand dollars earmarked for a charity, it may be better to get your employees more involved.  Causes need more than money.  They also need engaged advocates.  Write a check and you’ve definitely helped, sure.  Encourage participation, and you’ve helped create advocates.  One of my favorite causes is Free Wheelchair Mission. In 2015 we set a goal to raise enough money to buy 200 wheel chairs and ran in the Surf City half marathon race in Huntington Beach California to collect donations to meet our objective. In this process we got some of our people very excited about the cause and were able to exceed our plan and provide 217 chairs to disadvantaged folks around the world.  The experience was great and provided more to all involved than could have possibly been expected from simply writing a check.

Look for Philanthropic Routines

There are a number of ways to help that will easily fit with what you do already.  What happens to your recyclables?  There are organizations that will pick them up on a regular basis.  The same goes for your empty ink cartridges.  What do you do with your obsolete technology?  Remember, to a tech company, obsolete means something entirely different than it does to a non-profit that really only needs to handle word processing and communications.  Actions that seem insignificant to you can be remarkably important to others.

Have a Heart

Remember that causes are important to those who champion them.  Do your best to help when you can.  When you can’t, make sure you treat the folks asking for help with respect.  Trying to be a part of something bigger than any individual ought to be respected.  If you send people on their way empty-handed, don’t send on their way empty-hearted.